Thursday, June 19, 2014

ACT 2: Project Requiem - A Summary So Far



What follows is a round-up of recent posts from the ACT blog summarising our progress on Project Requiem as we move closer to completion, beginning with a complete catalogue of the 3D forms created by students in response to a) the motion-capture data curves derived from the conductor's movements and b) from their own synesthetic responses to the seven movements of the Requiem.



Renders

Requiem


Dies Irae


Offertorio


Sanctus


Agnus Dei


Lux Aeterna


Libera Me



From the forty-two student submissions we could only select one sculpture for each of the seven parts of Verdi’s Requiem.  
The selected forms were as follows:



Because of the complex and varied nature of these sculptures we needed to find a common method of abstraction in order for these sculptures to be fabricated. The method we chose involved processing each sculpture into seven flat, interlocking shapes, which are generated from their profile at seven equidistant angles. Think of them as snapshots, which when recombined, form a buildable structure.

Requiem


Dies Irae


Offertorio


Sanctus


Agnus Dei


Lux Aeterna


Libera Me



The outcome of this is that we now have our final seven sculptures representing the seven movements of Verdi’s Requiem. You can view the all the turnarounds in the following playlist. (Note the colours used in these turnarounds do not represent the final chosen colours).



The seven sculptures have since transitioned from digital data to physical forms, as Tim Hall, our fabricator, revealed the laser-cut maquettes of our seven Requiem-derived sculptures.  There was a real sense of excitement as Tim unwrapped the bubble wrap and we could see the sculptures-to-be for the first time.  Now all you have to do is imagine them four times as large, welded together from sheet steel and painted in solid, bright colours! 

Dies Irae

Offertorio

Sanctus

Libera Me

Lux Aeterna

The Final Seven
On July 3rd, we'll be collecting the finished sculptures from the workshop and transporting them to the Royal Opera House's High House Production Park in Purfleet.  The seven sculptures will be installed on the lawn in readiness for a live performance of the Requiem taking place in the evening.  Perhaps one of the most fascinating moments will be when conductor, Arie Van Beek, first encounters the seven sculptures derived from his own movements!  

Watch this space for more updates in the coming days - and to all those students who participated in the challenge, many thanks.  Inspiring work as always from the CAA community!


2 comments:

  1. Hey Phil, Livi and I are both applying for the erasmus, did you get Livi's email about signing our forms?

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  2. Hello! I found these pictures which reminded me of this project: http://imgur.com/a/3O2EJ

    Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete